erase

Syntax:

    #include <string>
    iterator erase( iterator loc );
    iterator erase( iterator start, iterator end );
    basic_string& erase( size_type index = 0, size_type num = npos );

The erase() function either:

  • removes the character pointed to by loc, returning an iterator to the character after the last character removed
  • removes all characters between start and end, returning an iterator to the next character (not the one at end)
  • removes num characters starting from index, returning the modified string. The parameters index and num have default values, which means that erase() can be called with just index to erase all characters after index or with no arguments to erase all characters.

For example:

  string s("So, you like donuts, eh? Well, have all the donuts in the world!");
  cout << "The original string is '" << s << "'" << endl;
 
  s.erase( 50, 13 );
  cout << "Now the string is '" << s << "'" << endl;
  s.erase( 24 );
  cout << "Now the string is '" << s << "'" << endl;
  s.erase();
  cout << "Now the string is '" << s << "'" << endl;

will display

  The original string is 'So, you like donuts, eh? Well, have all the donuts in the world!'
  Now the string is 'So, you like donuts, eh? Well, have all the donuts!'
  Now the string is 'So, you like donuts, eh?'
  Now the string is ''

erase() runs in linear time.

Related Topics: insert